Buying Used Lab Equipment

Few scientists have money to burn, especially when it comes to purchasing lab equipment. Lab instruments arguably represent the biggest slice of a lab's funding pie. Fortunately, scientists aren't restricted to buying new instruments at standard retail prices. They can purchase equipment second-hand, saving up to 70 percent on anything from a test tube to a production-scale fermenter. Buying used lab equipment is not limited to those who run poorly funded high school labs.

Other Author
Nov 11, 2001
Few scientists have money to burn, especially when it comes to purchasing lab equipment. Lab instruments arguably represent the biggest slice of a lab's funding pie. Fortunately, scientists aren't restricted to buying new instruments at standard retail prices. They can purchase equipment second-hand, saving up to 70 percent on anything from a test tube to a production-scale fermenter.

Buying used lab equipment is not limited to those who run poorly funded high school labs. Investigators in established research or industry labs and academic facilities should also examine the secondary equipment market. Along with the potential financial benefits, there are other advantages to buying used lab equipment: minimizing landfill fodder, helping others get money for their unwanted items, saving on equipment upgrades, and even helping a charity. Furthermore, many sources of used lab equipment can ship rapidly-often faster than standard channels that send new equipment.

Reaping the financial benefits of buying...