On A Roll: Keep those bottles rollin' with this year's newest hybridization ovens

Date: June 21, 1999 Table of Hybridization Ovens If you've been around molecular biology labs long enough, you'll remember the days when you reached the end of a lengthy probe-labeling procedure and all that was left to do was throw your sizzling probe in with your membrane to hybridize. Sounds like you're almost finished, right? Except it was never that easy. Eliminating air bubbles from sealed plastic bags without squeezing out your precious probe and contaminating the bag sealer, the bench,

Alison Paladichuk
Jun 20, 1999

Date: June 21, 1999 Table of Hybridization Ovens

If you've been around molecular biology labs long enough, you'll remember the days when you reached the end of a lengthy probe-labeling procedure and all that was left to do was throw your sizzling probe in with your membrane to hybridize. Sounds like you're almost finished, right? Except it was never that easy. Eliminating air bubbles from sealed plastic bags without squeezing out your precious probe and contaminating the bag sealer, the bench, and yourself would try the patience of a saint! If you're too young to remember the ordeal, you'll never understand, but you kids don't know how easy you have it!

Today's rotating hybridization ovens allow you to seal your probe in with your membrane with little more effort than the twist of a bottle cap. Of course, if you have the luxury of using large enough volumes of hybridization...

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