Recourse to Death

Manufactureres of Flow Cytometry Products for Apoptosis Detection To examine the causes of life, we must first have recourse to death," uttered Victor Frankenstein upon beginning his search for the source from "whence the principle of life proceeds" and ultimately creating his nameless monster. Frankenstein's real creator, 19-year-old Mary Shelley, probably had no idea when Frankenstein was first published in 1816 that her main character's motivation would eventually have real-life implication

Michael Brush
Aug 20, 2000

Manufactureres of Flow Cytometry Products for Apoptosis Detection

To examine the causes of life, we must first have recourse to death," uttered Victor Frankenstein upon beginning his search for the source from "whence the principle of life proceeds" and ultimately creating his nameless monster. Frankenstein's real creator, 19-year-old Mary Shelley, probably had no idea when Frankenstein was first published in 1816 that her main character's motivation would eventually have real-life implications. Nearly 200 years later, the recourse to death provided by the investigation of programmed cell death, or apoptosis, has reached fruition with a handful of new drugs entering clinical trials. Designed to promote or inhibit apoptosis as required, these drugs are promising treatments for various cancers, stroke, and organ- transplant rejection.1

Apoptosis researchers have no shortage of tools available to aid them in their work.2,3 Among the many applications and methods, flow cytometry has proven to...

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