Sequence or Die: Automated Instrumentation for the Genome Era

Date: April 12, 1999Table of DNA Sequencers LI-COR's IR2 Automated DNA Sequencer The first time I ran a sequencing gel using 35S rather than 32P, I was in heaven. The bands on the autoradiogram were incredibly sharp, the background was amazingly clean, and my read length increased by close to 20% to just over 100 bases. Things just couldn't get any better than that! In 1994, The Scientist reviewed the state of DNA sequencing technology and made some predictions about what might be coming next

Bob Sinclair
Apr 11, 1999

Date: April 12, 1999Table of DNA Sequencers

LI-COR's IR2 Automated DNA Sequencer
The first time I ran a sequencing gel using 35S rather than 32P, I was in heaven. The bands on the autoradiogram were incredibly sharp, the background was amazingly clean, and my read length increased by close to 20% to just over 100 bases. Things just couldn't get any better than that!

In 1994, The Scientist reviewed the state of DNA sequencing technology and made some predictions about what might be coming next.1 Technologies based on acrylamide slab gels were the only commercially available options. The Applied Biosystems (now the Applied Biosystems Division of Perkin Elmer, commonly called ABI or ABD) model 373 four-color fluorescent sequencer was firmly entrenched as the market leader. Pharmacia's ALF single-color fluorescent sequencer was also available, as was an early single-color machine from LI-COR that operated in the...

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