Building A Better Mouse Trap: INTEGRA Biosciences CELLine

The challenge for many laboratories growing hybridoma cell lines is producing adequate amounts of monoclonal antibody (MAb) given the constraints of space, time, and money. Large volumes of antibody typically require an investment in expensive bioreactors, space allocated to a multitude of tissue culture flasks stacked in incubators, or very large mice. "Build a better mouse trap and the world will beat a path to your door," or so the saying goes. With that thought in mind, INTEGRA Biosciences

The Scientist Staff
Apr 12, 1998

The challenge for many laboratories growing hybridoma cell lines is producing adequate amounts of monoclonal antibody (MAb) given the constraints of space, time, and money. Large volumes of antibody typically require an investment in expensive bioreactors, space allocated to a multitude of tissue culture flasks stacked in incubators, or very large mice.

"Build a better mouse trap and the world will beat a path to your door," or so the saying goes. With that thought in mind, INTEGRA Biosciences (Ijamsville, Md.) has expanded its family of cell cultivation devices and systems with the introduction of its CELLine chambers. Based on membrane technology, the INTEGRA CELLine devices offer a novel approach to cell growth and antibody production.


INTEGRA CELLine 1000
Each of the three different sized devices consists of an upper compartment for cell media and a chamber for cells surrounded by a membrane on each side. The topmost membrane of...

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