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Have It Three Ways

Novagen's pTriEx-1 vector contains bacterial, insect, and mammalian promoters. When studying protein function, researchers must often express a protein of interest in different systems for different applications. High-yield requirements might call for cloning of the target gene into an Escherichia coli expression vector, whereas subsequent activity studies might benefit from insect or mammalian cell expression. Obtaining the perfect balance between yield and activity may also inspire testing of

Aileen Constans


Novagen's pTriEx-1 vector contains bacterial, insect, and mammalian promoters.
When studying protein function, researchers must often express a protein of interest in different systems for different applications. High-yield requirements might call for cloning of the target gene into an Escherichia coli expression vector, whereas subsequent activity studies might benefit from insect or mammalian cell expression. Obtaining the perfect balance between yield and activity may also inspire testing of several different expression systems. Until recently, testing of multiple systems was time consuming, involving cloning and verification of recombinants in each system-specific vector. Novagen, of Madison, Wis., solves this problem with its pTriEx-1 Multisystem Vector, providing three promoters in one convenient vector and eliminating the need to prepare individual constructs.

The pTriEx-1 vector allows high-level gene expression in mammalian, E. coli, and insect cells. The pTriEx-1 vector combines the features of Novagen's popular pET, BacVector, and BacMam...

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