Info Services for Chemical Regs

This Is second of two articles on keeping up with changes in chemical regulations. The first article, "How to Keep up With Chemical Regs" appeared In the May 18, 1987 issue of The Scientist, p. 18. Although newsletters attempt to keep one current, they are neither comprehensive nor do they provide what might be called an information base on which to build. For example, a newsletter is likely to mention the addition of a hazardous waste to the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA); it is

Kenneth Clansky
Jun 1, 1987
This Is second of two articles on keeping up with changes in chemical regulations. The first article, "How to Keep up With Chemical Regs" appeared In the May 18, 1987 issue of The Scientist, p. 18.

Although newsletters attempt to keep one current, they are neither comprehensive nor do they provide what might be called an information base on which to build. For example, a newsletter is likely to mention the addition of a hazardous waste to the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA); it is unlikely to provide you with a reference copy of the RCRA or even a copy of the revised section of the Code of Federal Regulations. This is where information services come in.

At their simplest, information services are, in fact, an extension of a newsletter. For example, Business and Legal Reports' Right-to-Know Compliance Advisor, mentioned in the first part of this series,...

Interested in reading more?

Become a Member of

Receive full access to digital editions of The Scientist, as well as TS Digest, feature stories, more than 35 years of archives, and much more!
Already a member?