Pathological Screening on a Bigger Screen

Courtesy of GT VisionHistologists and pathologists examining slide after slide each day now have a new tool to ease their microscopy headaches and dramatically increase their throughput as well. Surveyor, an automated imaging system from Frederick, Md.-based GT Vision http://www.gt-vision.com scans whole sections at 25 fields of view per second. The system includes a motorized microscope stage, high-specification workstation PC, and camera, according to company literature.Users view slides on a

Aileen Constans
May 23, 2004
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Courtesy of GT Vision

Histologists and pathologists examining slide after slide each day now have a new tool to ease their microscopy headaches and dramatically increase their throughput as well. Surveyor, an automated imaging system from Frederick, Md.-based GT Vision http://www.gt-vision.com scans whole sections at 25 fields of view per second. The system includes a motorized microscope stage, high-specification workstation PC, and camera, according to company literature.

Users view slides on a computer screen rather than through an eyepiece, thus reducing operator fatigue. Surveyor presents two separate on-screen images of the specimen: a map of the entire slide and a live image of a specific point at any magnification. By clicking any point on the map, users can quickly zoom in on features of interest. "Users of the system say that in general, it's reduced the time taken to study sections by up to 95 percent, because they see everything...

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