Redesigning a Web Pioneer

The oldest Web resource for life scientists just got a facelift. Bio.com got a new design and editorial focus last month; by year's end the site will also feature customized information for its users and an improved online store. Bio.com, established in 1992, can claim to be one of the first 50 sites on the World Wide Web. "Until 1994-95 there was nothing similar," says Lee Jensen, Bio.com CEO and founder. Since then, however, the number of Web sites that provide quality information and resou

Laura Bonetta
Oct 28, 2001
The oldest Web resource for life scientists just got a facelift. Bio.com got a new design and editorial focus last month; by year's end the site will also feature customized information for its users and an improved online store.

Bio.com, established in 1992, can claim to be one of the first 50 sites on the World Wide Web. "Until 1994-95 there was nothing similar," says Lee Jensen, Bio.com CEO and founder. Since then, however, the number of Web sites that provide quality information and resources to busy scientists has skyrocketed, and several offer different combinations of what Bio.com provides. To maintain its user base (which today consists of about 250,000 sessions per month), Bio.com has continued to evolve in content and Web technology.

The overall aim of Bio.com is to collect and organize practical information of interest to bench scientists. All the information available on the site is collected...

Interested in reading more?

The Scientist ARCHIVED CONTENT

ACCESS MORE THAN 30,000 ARTICLES ACROSS MANY TOPICS AND DISCIPLINES

Become a Member of

Receive full access to more than 35 years of archived stories, digital editions of The Scientist Magazine, and much more!
Already a member?