Right On Track

One of the problems facing scientists is how to organize data among teams of researchers. Compiling information from an assortment of notebooks and transposing a variety of different styles of handwriting can be an arduous process fraught with problems. Occasionally, an important result may be misinterpreted or lost altogether, altering the complexion of an experiment that demanded days or weeks of intensive work. Screen shot from Avatar Consulting's LABTrack Notebook Laboratory Information Ma

Brent Johnson
Feb 1, 1999

One of the problems facing scientists is how to organize data among teams of researchers. Compiling information from an assortment of notebooks and transposing a variety of different styles of handwriting can be an arduous process fraught with problems. Occasionally, an important result may be misinterpreted or lost altogether, altering the complexion of an experiment that demanded days or weeks of intensive work.


Screen shot from Avatar Consulting's LABTrack Notebook
Laboratory Information Management (LIM) systems were introduced to provide a common repository for data in which researchers could share their findings instantly, without the bother of leafing through notebooks and binders. However, many LIM systems suffer from excessive price and complicated programs that are perhaps better suited to programmers rather than bench scientists.

The LABTrack Notebook from Avatar Consulting is an inexpensive alternative to the LIM systems of the past. Avatar's electronic notebook provides researchers with the power of higher-priced...

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