Save the Mice

"Save the mice" may sound like an animal rights slogan, but it is smart science to researchers in the Comparative Mouse Genomics Center at the University of Washington in Seattle. A major drawback of working with laboratory mice is having to kill the animals to measure endpoints such as tumor development and bone loss. Director Warren Ladiges, a veterinarian, and his colleagues are trying to save mice--and the cost of replacing them--by developing noninvasive techniques for whole-body imaging

Jane Salodof Macneil
Mar 9, 2003

"Save the mice" may sound like an animal rights slogan, but it is smart science to researchers in the Comparative Mouse Genomics Center at the University of Washington in Seattle. A major drawback of working with laboratory mice is having to kill the animals to measure endpoints such as tumor development and bone loss. Director Warren Ladiges, a veterinarian, and his colleagues are trying to save mice--and the cost of replacing them--by developing noninvasive techniques for whole-body imaging.



Photo Courtesy of Robert Miyaoka
 VET PET POWER: A micro-crystal element (MICE) detector module for the PET system. This array, comprised of 22 x 22 crystals, each 0.8 mm x 0.8 mm, is inserted into a grid made of a highly reflective polymer film.

Radiochemist Kenneth Krohn created a mouse-sized positron emission tomography (PET) scanner. The project also uses equipment designed for humans: a Lorad MII X-ray mammography unit and a Norland...

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