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Sphere of Influence

Luminex's unique microsphere addressing system In the past, a researcher bragging about running 100 different assays per minute in a single test tube might be counseled to get some sleep and stop breathing hazardous fumes. LabMAP (Laboratory Multiple Analyte Profiling) technology developed by Luminex Corp. of Austin, Texas, now makes such claims possible and miraculously expands analytical assay development. Luminex uses a proprietary dyeing process to label polystyrene microspheres with p

Jorge Cortese


Luminex's unique microsphere addressing system
In the past, a researcher bragging about running 100 different assays per minute in a single test tube might be counseled to get some sleep and stop breathing hazardous fumes. LabMAP (Laboratory Multiple Analyte Profiling) technology developed by Luminex Corp. of Austin, Texas, now makes such claims possible and miraculously expands analytical assay development.

Luminex uses a proprietary dyeing process to label polystyrene microspheres with precise ratios of two spectrally distinguishable fluorophores. This process generates 100 different microspheres, each with a unique fluorescent signature. Assay reagents such as antibodies are then linked to "addressed" microsphere sets, and specific reactants from biological samples (antigens) detected with reporter molecules conjugated to a third fluorophore. After assaying, the microsphere suspension (Suspension Array) is sorted and interrogated individually in a fluid system that passes through two separated laser beams: red to classify the microspheres by their addresses...

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