Watch Your Transfections ... Literally

There is always room for improvement, even for products that were good from the start. Take cationic liposome-based reagents, for example. Researchers have widely used such compounds to efficiently introduce nucleic acids into cells for over a decade. Qbiogene of Carlsbad, Calif., recently improved on this technology with the introduction of in vivo and in vitro FluoroFectin™ reagents, developed in the laboratory of Yechezkel Barenholz of the Hebrew University in Jerusalem. FluoroFectin

Aileen Constans
Jul 7, 2002

There is always room for improvement, even for products that were good from the start. Take cationic liposome-based reagents, for example. Researchers have widely used such compounds to efficiently introduce nucleic acids into cells for over a decade. Qbiogene of Carlsbad, Calif., recently improved on this technology with the introduction of in vivo and in vitro FluoroFectin™ reagents, developed in the laboratory of Yechezkel Barenholz of the Hebrew University in Jerusalem.

FluoroFectin reagents are fluorescently tagged, cationic liposome-based reagents that, unlike conventional transfection reagents, allow visualization of transfection events. They are available in a variety of formulations: dioleoyltrimethylammonium propane (DOTAP); DOTAP/dioleoylphosphatidylethanolamine (DOPE), for transfection of insect cells; and DOTAP/Cholesterol, for enhanced transfection efficiency. A specialized version of DOTAP/Cholesterol is available for in vivo research. FluoroFectin reagents offer an alternative to reporter gene assays and can be used in high-throughput fluorescence-activated cell-sorting (FACS) analysis. According to product manager Jane MacDougall,...

Interested in reading more?

Become a Member of

Receive full access to digital editions of The Scientist, as well as TS Digest, feature stories, more than 35 years of archives, and much more!
Already a member?