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Rendered image of <em>Chlamydia</em>
How Chlamydia Guards Itself Against the Immune System
The bacterium produces a particular protein that allows it to sneak past the human immune system even while triggering inflammation.
How Chlamydia Guards Itself Against the Immune System
How Chlamydia Guards Itself Against the Immune System

The bacterium produces a particular protein that allows it to sneak past the human immune system even while triggering inflammation.

The bacterium produces a particular protein that allows it to sneak past the human immune system even while triggering inflammation.

The Literature
An image of a pale, dead tree taken from the ground, so that the tree limbs stretch up into the sky.&nbsp;
Certain Tree Species Are More Susceptible to Death by Lightning
Hannah Thomasy | Dec 12, 2022 | 2 min read
Expected increases in lightning strikes due to climate change could alter the botanical composition of tropical forests.
A fossilized mammoth tusk sitting in a grassy field during sunset&nbsp;
Woolly Mammoth Genomes Reveal Genetic Adaptations to Cold
Hannah Thomasy | Dec 12, 2022 | 2 min read
Researchers identified mutations in genes that may be involved in fat regulation, fur growth, and morphology.
A colored microscopy image showing cells that are dying in yellow and healthy cells in blue&nbsp;
Sweet Taste Receptors Regulate Proteins in Developing Fruit Flies
Tess Joosse | Nov 14, 2022 | 2 min read
An unexpected find shows that sweet-sensing receptors also help epithelial cells in Drosophila larvae stay alive amid proteotoxic stress.
Photo of a Guppy fish
Fish Brain Region Size Correlates with Cognitive Flexibility
Natalia Mesa, PhD | Nov 14, 2022 | 3 min read
The relative sizes of specific parts of the guppy brain may explain why some fish are better at learning certain tasks than others. 
A closeup of a dead frog floating in water with aquatic plants underneath it
Chytrid Fungus Deploys Varying Strategies to Infect Amphibians
Tess Joosse | Nov 14, 2022 | 2 min read
The ability to activate different sets of genes has likely helped the chytrid fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis spread widely in amphibians, resulting in global population declines. 
A mesquite tree in an arid environment
Climate Change May Favor Nitrogen-Fixing Plants
Andy Carstens | Oct 17, 2022 | 2 min read
Aridity appears to configure landscapes with a greater diversity of plant species that rely on symbiotic bacteria for nitrogen.
A false color transmission electron microscope micrograph showing the nuclear envelope, the rough endoplasmic reticulum, the nucleus, and the cytoplasm.
New Gene Mutants Identified in Rare Motor Neuron Diseases
Clare Watson | Oct 17, 2022 | 2 min read
The discovery of gene variants in cases of hereditary spastic dysplasia could provide a diagnosis to affected families where no genetic cause could be found before.
Newborn baby rats lie in a basket
Mother’s Circadian Rhythms Mirrored in Fetal Rat Brains
Bianca Nogrady | Sep 12, 2022 | 2 min read
Before their own central clocks develop, the brains of fetal rats detect their mother’s metabolic cycle to help regulate the expression of certain genes.
Neurons and muscle tissue
A Novel Player at the Neuromuscular Junction
Catherine Offord | Sep 12, 2022 | 3 min read
The muscle transmembrane protein Vangl2 helps organize the development and maintenance of connections between muscles and motor neurons, a study concludes.
A California coyote above Santa Monica beach
Human Gut Bacteria Show Up in Urban Wildlife
Bianca Nogrady | Sep 12, 2022 | 2 min read
The gut microbiomes of city-dwelling animals, including coyotes, lizards, and birds, show similarities to those found in humans who also live in urban environments.
A gametophyte of the brown alga <em>Desmarestia dudresnayi</em> that has both male and female reproductive structures
Meet the Algae That Went from Male/Female to Hermaphroditic
Natalia Mesa, PhD | Aug 1, 2022 | 2 min read
A study suggests that several species of brown algae may have independently evolved to express both sexes simultaneously, and it’s likely that female algae evolved male traits—not the other way around.
A colored microscope image of a cross section of a human artery filled with fatty plaques
Protein-Recycling Process Protective Against Arterial Plaques
Clare Watson | Aug 1, 2022 | 2 min read
A team of scientists has found that in mice, a cellular housekeeping pathway protects against a major cause of heart attacks and strokes.
Antibiotic resistant bacteria inside a biofilm, 3D illustration. Biofilm is a community of bacteria where they aquire antibiotic resistance and communicate with each other by quorum sensing molecules
How a Bacterium Manages to Reproduce During Famine
Viviane Callier | Jul 18, 2022 | 3 min read
When Caulobacter crescentus finds itself in a nutrient-poor environment, it clusters an enzyme necessary for cell division thanks to a physical phenomenon known as phase separation so it can make better use of dwindling fuel.
red ants coming out of dirt hole
Bull Ant Venom Evolved to Make Bites More Painful to Mammals
Dan Robitzski | Jul 5, 2022 | 2 min read
A peptide found in bull ant venom closely resembles a hormone of its primary predator, triggering hypersensitivity and making subsequent bites even more painful than the ones that came before.
Illustration of two weaving proteins 
Fusion with Spider Silk Increases Anticancer Protein’s Stability
Dan Robitzski | Jul 5, 2022 | 2 min read
Scientists found that combining the notoriously flimsy anticancer protein p53 with a domain from a spider silk protein resulted in a more stable hybrid that’s more potent and easier for cells to synthesize.
A microscope image of Legionellales bacteria infecting a protozoan
Ancestral Bacteria May Have Invaded Early Eukaryotic Cells
Clare Watson | Jun 1, 2022 | 2 min read
The discovery that a group of cell-infecting bacteria lived roughly 2 billion years ago stirs a longstanding controversy around which came first: phagocytosis or mitochondria.
An artist's rendering of the ancient arthropod Erratus sperare
Anatomical Firsts in Early Arthropods
Clare Watson | Jun 1, 2022 | 2 min read
A team of scientists have discovered an ancient arthropod that may show the origins of branched limbs and the first gill-like breathing structures in the clade.
salmonella bacteria 3d illustration
Salmonella Injection Helps the Mouse Immune System Kill Tumors
Dan Robitzski | May 16, 2022 | 3 min read
Nanoparticle-coated bacteria can capture tumor antigens and deliver them to immune cells, triggering a response that improved survival rates in mice.
Image of not-to-scale renderings of the skulls of various primate species
Surface Area of Tooth Roots Predicts Primate Body Size
Maddie Bender | May 2, 2022 | 2 min read
Researchers determine that a primate’s tooth root, and not just its crown, can yield reliable information about body size, but the relationship between root surface area and diet isn’t as clear.
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