Fungi Squeezed Through Microchannels Offer Clues to Cell Growth
Fungi Squeezed Through Microchannels Offer Clues to Cell Growth
A study finds that fast-growing species are stymied by narrow gaps, while slower-growing species can pass through and continue extending.
Fungi Squeezed Through Microchannels Offer Clues to Cell Growth
Fungi Squeezed Through Microchannels Offer Clues to Cell Growth

A study finds that fast-growing species are stymied by narrow gaps, while slower-growing species can pass through and continue extending.

A study finds that fast-growing species are stymied by narrow gaps, while slower-growing species can pass through and continue extending.

The Literature
Broken Heart Syndrome Linked to the Brain
Broken Heart Syndrome Linked to the Brain
Amanda Heidt | Jun 1, 2021
A chronically stressed amygdala can prime the heart to overreact to acute stress events, a new study shows.
Mucosal Vaccines Protect Mice from Viruses, Cancer
Mucosal Vaccines Protect Mice from Viruses, Cancer
Emma Yasinski | Jun 1, 2021
Scientists use a protein found in mucus membranes to ferry vaccines to the lymph nodes.
When Pursuing Prey, Bats Tune Out the World
When Pursuing Prey, Bats Tune Out the World
Lisa Winter | May 1, 2021
As they close in for the kill, the flying mammals use quieter echolocation to focus on the chase.
Aphid Salivary Gene May Regulate Gall Color
Aphid Salivary Gene May Regulate Gall Color
Asher Jones | May 1, 2021
Whether the galls that aphids make on witch hazel leaves are red or green is associated with a gene expressed in the insects’ salivary glands.
“Rogue” Protein Could Contribute to Humans’ High Cancer Rates
“Rogue” Protein Could Contribute to Humans’ High Cancer Rates
Asher Jones | Apr 1, 2021
A mutant protein called Siglec-XII may promote carcinoma progression in humans, but inactivation of its gene seems to avoid the problem, according to a study.
Obesity-Linked Gut Bacteria May Worsen Graft-Versus-Host Disease
Obesity-Linked Gut Bacteria May Worsen Graft-Versus-Host Disease
Asher Jones | Apr 1, 2021
Altered gut microbiome composition in obese mice and human patients is linked with severity of disease after bone marrow transplantation, a study found.
Flexible Synapse Strength May Underpin Mammal Brain’s Complexity
Flexible Synapse Strength May Underpin Mammal Brain’s Complexity
Asher Jones | Mar 24, 2021
Neural connections in the mouse neocortex can release multiple packages of neurotransmitters per electrical impulse, a study finds.
Long-Lived Trees’ Epigenetic Mutations Serve as a Molecular Clock
Long-Lived Trees’ Epigenetic Mutations Serve as a Molecular Clock
Jef Akst | Mar 1, 2021
Cells found in different branches of a tree have different patterns of DNA methylation, changes in which accumulate over time.
Macrophages of the Human Eye Come into Focus
Macrophages of the Human Eye Come into Focus
Ashley Yeager | Mar 1, 2021
Imaged in real time in living people, immune cells at the surface of the retina could serve as biomarkers to detect retinal and possibly neurological diseases and track their progression.
Neurons for Taste Loosely Distributed in Mouse Gustatory Cortex
Neurons for Taste Loosely Distributed in Mouse Gustatory Cortex
Jef Akst | Mar 1, 2021
Neurological representations of different tastes—like those of different smells but unlike those of sight, hearing, and touch—do not cluster in distinct spots within a murine brain region, a study shows.
Petunia’s Waxy Cuticle Regulates the Plant’s Sweet Smell
Petunia’s Waxy Cuticle Regulates the Plant’s Sweet Smell
Ashley Yeager | Feb 1, 2021
The thicker the flower petals’ cuticle, the more fragrance compounds the plant releases, according to a recent study.
Invertebrate Density Influences Plant Flowering Times, Abundance
Invertebrate Density Influences Plant Flowering Times, Abundance
Catherine Offord | Feb 1, 2021
An experimental study explores how plant communities may be affected by future declines in invertebrate populations.
Retrons Help Bacteria Defend Themselves from Phages: Study
Retrons Help Bacteria Defend Themselves from Phages: Study
Catherine Offord | Feb 1, 2021
The mysterious DNA sequences appear to help bacterial cells spot when they’ve been infected with viruses—and prompt those cells to self-destruct.
New Screening Approach Reveals Novel Regulators of Microcephaly
New Screening Approach Reveals Novel Regulators of Microcephaly
Catherine Offord | Jan 1, 2021
Researchers combine organoids, CRISPR-Cas9, and cellular barcoding technologies to identify genes that influence brain size.
How RNAs Called SINEUPs Upregulate Translation
How RNAs Called SINEUPs Upregulate Translation
Catherine Offord | Jan 1, 2021
The recently discovered long noncoding RNAs seem to boost the production of specific proteins in the cell by interacting with RNA-binding proteins, researchers find.
Stress-Induced Chromosome Changes Protect Flies’ Aging Brains
Stress-Induced Chromosome Changes Protect Flies’ Aging Brains
Lisa Winter | Dec 1, 2020
Brain cells in older Drosophila tend to have more than two complete sets of chromosomes, and that polyploidy most likely has a protective function, a study shows.
Immune Genes Protect Cells from Ebola Virus and SARS-CoV-2
Immune Genes Protect Cells from Ebola Virus and SARS-CoV-2
Rachael Moeller Gorman | Dec 1, 2020
A pathway involved in the adaptive immune system, a relative newcomer in the world of pathogen defense, may have a more ancient role in protecting cells from invading viruses.
Unearthed: World’s Oldest Animal Sperm—And It’s Giant
Unearthed: World’s Oldest Animal Sperm—And It’s Giant
Max Kozlov | Dec 1, 2020
The sperm, belonging to a tiny marine crustacean, dates back nearly 100 million years, making it the most ancient animal sperm found to date.
Herbivore Body Size Influences Grazing Behavior, Poop Quality
Herbivore Body Size Influences Grazing Behavior, Poop Quality
Catherine Offord | Nov 1, 2020
Researchers disentangle complex connections among vegetation, herbivores, and dung in the South African savanna.