A cancerous melody

A linkurl:project;http://bcl.med.harvard.edu/proteomics/proj/csf/menu.php at Harvard Medical School aims to bring music to medicine in a way that goes beyond setting the mood in the waiting room. Gene transcription and translation are anything but simple. But by combining modern statistics with the sounds of a sweet melody, bioinformatician linkurl:Gil Alterovitz;http://www.mit.edu/%7Egil/ may make interpreting these complex phenomena and diagnosing the diseases that result from abnormalities in

Jef Akst
Jef Akst

Jef (an unusual nickname for Jennifer) got her master’s degree from Indiana University in April 2009 studying the mating behavior of seahorses. After four years of diving off the Gulf...

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Sep 24, 2009
A linkurl:project;http://bcl.med.harvard.edu/proteomics/proj/csf/menu.php at Harvard Medical School aims to bring music to medicine in a way that goes beyond setting the mood in the waiting room. Gene transcription and translation are anything but simple. But by combining modern statistics with the sounds of a sweet melody, bioinformatician linkurl:Gil Alterovitz;http://www.mit.edu/%7Egil/ may make interpreting these complex phenomena and diagnosing the diseases that result from abnormalities in gene expression much more manageable tasks.
Human embryonic stem cells
Image: Gil Alterovitz
"I think it's brilliant that Gil is using a completely different channel for communicating complex genomic information," Latin and ballroom DJ Taro Muso writes in an email to The Scientist. "I've always wondered why doctors don't seem to use their ears beyond listening for natural bodily sounds." "It's deceptively simple," says bioinformatician linkurl:Yves Lussier;http://home.uchicago.edu/%7Elussier/about-lussier.htm of the University of Chicago. "It was conceptually challenging to come up with it, but once we know of...




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