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A fine time for equines

The American Museum of Natural History's new exhibit explores the human - horse relationship When I was seven years old I decided I'd rather be a horse than a human. In an attempt to dissuade me from this point of view, my parents had me start riding lessons when I was nine. It didn't work. I am still convinced the horse is a superior creature. So I was the natural choice from __The Scientist__'s editorial office to review __The Horse__, a new exhibition at the American Museum of Natural Hist

Margaret Guthrie
The American Museum of Natural History's new exhibit explores the human - horse relationship When I was seven years old I decided I'd rather be a horse than a human. In an attempt to dissuade me from this point of view, my parents had me start riding lessons when I was nine. It didn't work. I am still convinced the horse is a superior creature. So I was the natural choice from __The Scientist__'s editorial office to review __The Horse__, a new exhibition at the American Museum of Natural History in New York. To see some of the displays, click linkurl:here.;http://www.the-scientist.com/supplementary/flash/horses/horse.jsp More than a simple look at the linkurl:evolutionary;http://www.the-scientist.com/2008/6/1/32/1/history of the horse, the exhibit examines what domestication of the horse has meant to the development of human civilization. How did a timid quadruped help a puny, naked primate become a mighty force that has populated the planet? How did linkurl:horses;http://www.the-scientist.com/article/display/52958/...

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