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A match made in open access heaven?

Will BioMed Central, the publishing house that's been the flagship for open access for nearly a decade, be in good hands with Springer? Yes, say some open access advocates, as long as the BioMed Central (BMC) publishing model is allowed to persevere. Indeed, the linkurl:acquisition this week;http://www.the-scientist.com/blog/display/55074/ of BMC by Springer may send the signal to other commercial groups that open access works. "I think it's a good sign for open access," Heather Joseph, execut

Andrea Gawrylewski
Will BioMed Central, the publishing house that's been the flagship for open access for nearly a decade, be in good hands with Springer? Yes, say some open access advocates, as long as the BioMed Central (BMC) publishing model is allowed to persevere. Indeed, the linkurl:acquisition this week;http://www.the-scientist.com/blog/display/55074/ of BMC by Springer may send the signal to other commercial groups that open access works. "I think it's a good sign for open access," Heather Joseph, executive director of the Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition (SPARC), told The Scientist. "This is a nice indicator that open access is good for business, and not just a philosophical crusade." According to an Email sent to editors at BMC by the BMC publisher Matt Cockerill, BMC will be an autonomous operating unit within Springer, and everything remains business as usual. It may be too early to predict if and how Springer reconciles its...
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