A new Darwin revolution?

With Darwin day celebrations going on around the world, people are looking back on a man that changed science as part of a larger cultural revolution away from using theology to explain natural phenomenon and toward a more secular thinking. One wonders, however, where the next such revolution might take place. From where will the next groundbreaking scientific discovery that truly challenges the tenets of our social understanding come from? I'd offer -- linkurl:and I know I'm not the first;htt

Brendan Maher
Feb 11, 2007
With Darwin day celebrations going on around the world, people are looking back on a man that changed science as part of a larger cultural revolution away from using theology to explain natural phenomenon and toward a more secular thinking. One wonders, however, where the next such revolution might take place. From where will the next groundbreaking scientific discovery that truly challenges the tenets of our social understanding come from? I'd offer -- linkurl:and I know I'm not the first;http://www.the-scientist.com/2005/09/12/14/1/ -- neuroscience, particularly the deduction of the seat of consciousness. Defogging this mystery and finally making the mind something understandable and not merely miraculous is the next great challenge for biologists. A stellar linkurl:__New Yorker__;http://www.newyorker.com article appearing tomorrow hammered home for me just how rudimentary our understanding is, following a pair of philosophers Pat and Paul Churchland (it's their Valentine issue after all), as they struggle to convince their colleagues...

Interested in reading more?

Become a Member of

Receive full access to more than 35 years of archives, as well as TS Digest, digital editions of The Scientist, feature stories, and much more!
Already a member?