Alzheimer's clue found

Researchers report a step forward in understanding the pathology of Alzheimer's disease. Two genes that are commonly mutated in the early-onset form of Alzheimer's may cause the disorder by altering how presynaptic neurons release neurotransmitters, according to a study published this week in Nature. Image: Wikimedia commonsThe mechanism may apply to other neurodegenerative disorders as well, the researchers say. "This is a new concept that's interesting to know," said molecular neurobiologi

Jef Akst
Jef Akst

Jef (an unusual nickname for Jennifer) got her master’s degree from Indiana University in April 2009 studying the mating behavior of seahorses. After four years of diving off the Gulf...

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Jul 28, 2009
Researchers report a step forward in understanding the pathology of Alzheimer's disease. Two genes that are commonly mutated in the early-onset form of Alzheimer's may cause the disorder by altering how presynaptic neurons release neurotransmitters, according to a study published this week in Nature.
Image: Wikimedia commons
The mechanism may apply to other neurodegenerative disorders as well, the researchers say. "This is a new concept that's interesting to know," said molecular neurobiologist linkurl:Ilya Bezprozvanny;http://www4.utsouthwestern.edu/ilya/ of the Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas, who was not involved in the work. More than 100 different mutations in two genes coding for the proteins presenilin 1 and 2 are associated with early-onset Alzheimer's disease, but the exact effects of these mutations on neural function is still unclear. "It's the first [study] suggesting that presenilins play a presynaptic role," Bezprozvanny said. In 2007, molecular geneticist and neuroscientist linkurl:Jie Shen;http://www.hms.harvard.edu/dms/neuroscience/fac/shen.html of Harvard Medical School and...




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