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An inspiring hypoxia experiment

Jane Tomlinson, who is living with advanced breast cancer, starts her grueling 4200 mile, US-spanning bike ride to raise money for cancer research this Friday in San Francisco. According to her linkurl:Website,;http://www.janesappeal.com/ she?s run three London marathons, the NYC marathon, and completed the Ironman triathalon among other extreme exercise fundraisers since she was told nearly six years ago that she had six months to live. She?s been quoted as saying that she expects this to be t

Brendan Maher
Jane Tomlinson, who is living with advanced breast cancer, starts her grueling 4200 mile, US-spanning bike ride to raise money for cancer research this Friday in San Francisco. According to her linkurl:Website,;http://www.janesappeal.com/ she?s run three London marathons, the NYC marathon, and completed the Ironman triathalon among other extreme exercise fundraisers since she was told nearly six years ago that she had six months to live. She?s been quoted as saying that she expects this to be the most difficult trek of her life. I bet she?ll recall that prediction climbing above the 10,000-foot mark in the Rockies. In many linkurl:tumor microenvironments,;http://www.the-scientist.com/article/display/23272/ a hypoxic state or genetic changes may trigger activity of the hypoxia inducible factor linkurl:(HIF),;http://www.the-scientist.com/article/display/13717 a transcription factor that turns on a slew of genes for angiogenesis and may linkurl:turn off DNA repair.;http://www.the-scientist.com/article/display/22629/ The tumor essentially fools the body into thinking it needs more oxygen at the site of...

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