Menu

Animal Microbiomes Are Unique and Beneficial to Their Hosts

Survey of 24 animal species suggests that each hosts a custom-tailored microbiome.

Nov 29, 2016
Ben Andrew Henry

VANDERBILT UNIVERSITY, BORDENSTEIN LAB

Transplanting the microbiome of one species into another species can cause a whole host of problems, according to a study published this month (November 18) in PLOS Biology

In separate experiments by Vanderbilt University researchers, mice and wasps raised with the microbiota of closely related species suffered impaired digestion and lower overall survival rates—evidence that species host microbiomes tailored to their physiologies. The team also found that the evolutionary relationships between four animal groups paralleled the relationships between their microbiomes, supporting the notion that microbial communities living inside of animals evolve along with their hosts.

“Previous research has tended to concentrate on the negative effects of microbes. In this case we are showing that whole communities of microbes have positive effects as well,” coauthor Andrew Brooks of Vanderbilt University said in a press release.

Brooks and colleagues surveyed the microbiota of 24 species across four animal groups: deer mice, fruit flies, mosquitoes, and jewel wasps. They compared the phylogenetic tree of the host animals with the ecological relatedness of their microbiota, and, based on information about the composition of a given microbiome, used computer models to accurately predict the correct animal host 98.5 percent of the time, the authors report.

VANDERBILT UNIVERSITY, BORDENSTEIN LAB

To help explain the close association between animal species and their microbes, the authors then tested whether swapping an animal’s microbiome with that of a close relative incurred evolutionary disadvantages. They raised colonies of deer mice and jewel wasps, but some of the mice were raised with microbiota transplanted from related mouse species, and some of the wasps were likewise raised with transplanted microbes from related wasp species. The transplant mice digested food less efficiently than healthy mice, while the transplant wasps had lower overall survival rates than control groups.

“Plants and animals evolved in a planet dominated by microbial life,” said coauthor Seth Bordenstein of Vanderbilt University in the press release “So they had no choice but to tolerate microbes and, as we are now discovering, they also evolved the capacity to ‘garden’ them in order to enhance their health and fitness.”

February 2019

Big Storms Brewing

Can forests weather more major hurricanes?

Marketplace

Sponsored Product Updates

Bio-Rad Releases First FDA-Cleared Digital PCR System and Test for Monitoring Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Treatment Response
Bio-Rad Releases First FDA-Cleared Digital PCR System and Test for Monitoring Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Treatment Response
Bio-Rad Laboratories, Inc. (NYSE: BIO and BIOb), a global leader of life science research and clinical diagnostic products, today announced that its QXDx AutoDG ddPCR System, which uses Bio-Rad’s Droplet Digital PCR technology, and the QXDx BCR-ABL %IS Kit are the industry’s first digital PCR products to receive U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) clearance. Used together, Bio-Rad’s system and kit can precisely and reproducibly monitor molecular response to treatment in patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML).
Bio-Rad Showcases New Automation Features of its ZE5 Cell Analyzer at SLAS 2019
Bio-Rad Showcases New Automation Features of its ZE5 Cell Analyzer at SLAS 2019
Bio-Rad Laboratories, Inc. (NYSE: BIO and BIOb) today showcases new automation features of its ZE5 Cell Analyzer during the Society for Laboratory Automation and Screening 2019 International Conference and Exhibition (SLAS) in Washington, D.C., February 2–6. These capabilities enable the ZE5 to be used for high-throughput flow cytometry in biomarker discovery and phenotypic screening.
Andrew Alliance and Sartorius Collaborate to Provide Software-Connected Pipettes for Life Science Research
Andrew Alliance and Sartorius Collaborate to Provide Software-Connected Pipettes for Life Science Research
Researchers to benefit from an innovative software-connected pipetting system, bringing improved reproducibility and traceability of experiments to life-science laboratories.
Corning Life Sciences to Feature 3D Cell Culture Technologies at SLAS 2019
Corning Life Sciences to Feature 3D Cell Culture Technologies at SLAS 2019
Corning Incorporated (NYSE: GLW) will showcase advanced 3D cell culture technologies and workflow solutions for spheroids, organoids, tissue models, and applications including ADME/toxicology at the Society for Laboratory Automation and Screening (SLAS) conference, Feb. 2-6 in Washington, D.C.