Menu

Another New Timeline for Homo naledi

The ancient human may have lived around 200,000 to 300,000 years ago—much more recently than previously estimated.

Apr 27, 2017
Tracy Vence

H. naledi handsPETER SCHMID/JOHN HAWKSThe fossilized remains of Homo naledi—discovered in 2013 and described in 2015—are much more contemporary than previously estimated, according to codiscoverer Lee Berger of the National Geographic Society. In an interview with the organization’s magazine Berger said the bones are between 200,000 to 300,000 years old (via BBC News).

Last year, scientists at Simon Fraser University in Canada and their colleagues estimated that the H. naledi remains they had excavated were around 900,000 years old. At that time, paleoanthropologist Matthew Tocheri of Lakehead University in Canada told Science News that the ancient human’s timeline could again be changed by “a good geological date.”

See “New Timeline for Homo naledi

According to the BBC, scientists have so far been unsuccessful in their attempts to extract DNA from the ancient specimens. “[The remains] are obviously at an age where we have every reason to think there might be some chance,” codiscoverer John Hawks of the University of Wisconsin—Madison told BBC News. “The cave is relatively warm compared to the cold caves in northern Europe and Asia where we have really good DNA preservation.”

November 2018

Intelligent Science

Wrapping our heads around human smarts

Marketplace

Sponsored Product Updates

Slice® Safety Cutters for Lab Work

Slice® Safety Cutters for Lab Work

Slice cutting tools—which feature our patent-pending safety blades—meet many lab-specific requirements. Our scalpels and craft knives are well suited for delicate work, and our utility knives are good for general use.

The Lab of the Future: Alinity Poised to Reinvent Clinical Diagnostic Testing and Help Improve Healthcare

The Lab of the Future: Alinity Poised to Reinvent Clinical Diagnostic Testing and Help Improve Healthcare

Every minute counts when waiting for accurate diagnostic test results to guide critical care decisions, making today's clinical lab more important than ever. In fact, nearly 70 percent of critical care decisions are driven by a diagnostic test.

LGC announces new, integrated, global portfolio brand, Biosearch Technologies, representing genomic tools for mission critical customer applications

LGC announces new, integrated, global portfolio brand, Biosearch Technologies, representing genomic tools for mission critical customer applications

LGC’s Genomics division announced it is transforming its branding under LGC, Biosearch Technologies, a unified portfolio brand integrating optimised genomic analysis technologies and tools to accelerate scientific outcomes.