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Anti-open access bill is back

A bill aimed at undoing the NIH's mandate to make federally-funded research manuscripts freely available on PubMed Central within a year of publication was re-introduced in the US House of Representatives on Tuesday night (Feb. 3). The legislation claims that the NIH policy breaches existing copyright laws that protect academic publishers. If passed, the bill would stop federal agencies from requiring the transfer of copyright as a stipulation of investigators receiving taxpayer-backed grants.

Elie Dolgin
A bill aimed at undoing the NIH's mandate to make federally-funded research manuscripts freely available on PubMed Central within a year of publication was re-introduced in the US House of Representatives on Tuesday night (Feb. 3). The legislation claims that the NIH policy breaches existing copyright laws that protect academic publishers. If passed, the bill would stop federal agencies from requiring the transfer of copyright as a stipulation of investigators receiving taxpayer-backed grants. The details of the bill, HR 801, have not yet been made public, but the__ linkurl:Library Journal;http://www.libraryjournal.com/article/CA6634646.html __reports that those who have seen the legislation say it reads along the same lines as last year's version, dubbed the __Fair Copyright in Research Works Act__ (HR 6845). That bill, which was championed by linkurl:John Conyers;http://conyers.house.gov/ (D-Mich), the chairman of the linkurl:US House Committee on the Judiciary;http://judiciary.house.gov/ and an avowed critic of the NIH's public access mandate,...




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