Beer review

Noted Harvard epidemiologist linkurl:Meir Stampfer;http://www.hsph.harvard.edu/facres/stmpfr.html has decided that he no longer wants to publicly tout the benefits of beer anymore at benefits sponsored by? surprise, Anheuser-Busch, brewer of approximately 30 beers in the U.S. alone. The researcher?s decision to affiliate himself with the company sparked outrage among some addiction experts, who accused Stampfer of unethical practice. Stampfer defended himself by arguing that he was simply prom

Alison McCook
Jan 19, 2006
Noted Harvard epidemiologist linkurl:Meir Stampfer;http://www.hsph.harvard.edu/facres/stmpfr.html has decided that he no longer wants to publicly tout the benefits of beer anymore at benefits sponsored by? surprise, Anheuser-Busch, brewer of approximately 30 beers in the U.S. alone. The researcher?s decision to affiliate himself with the company sparked outrage among some addiction experts, who accused Stampfer of unethical practice. Stampfer defended himself by arguing that he was simply promoting the benefits of beer, which often gets overlooked by studies that say moderate amounts of alcohol can be healthy, but focus on wine, not other types of alcohol. Stampfer and others linkurl:have found;http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=15979440&query_hl=5&itool=pubmed_docsum that people can benefit from beer and liquor, as well. Stampfer also said that he never accepted money from Anheuser-Busch for his lectures about beer?s benefits. According to the Web site linkurl:Join Together;http://www.jointogether.org/home/, which helps fight substance abuse, Stampfer has not been paid directly, but the company gave $150,000 to Harvard...

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