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Bigfoot press conference yields little evidence, lots of scorn

The following is a post by Eric Vance, a freelancer for Scientific American, who sent us this story. PALO ALTO, CALIFORNIA -- It was perhaps the most highly touted linkurl:press conference;http://www.sciam.com/blog/60-second-science/post.cfm?id=bigfoot-press-conference-an-early-r-2008-08-15 of the week, but it didn't reveal much in the way of evidence: Three Bigfoot enthusiasts announced today that a series of genetic tests performed on samples taken from a carcass they claim is a linkurl:Sasqu

Alison McCook
The following is a post by Eric Vance, a freelancer for Scientific American, who sent us this story. PALO ALTO, CALIFORNIA -- It was perhaps the most highly touted linkurl:press conference;http://www.sciam.com/blog/60-second-science/post.cfm?id=bigfoot-press-conference-an-early-r-2008-08-15 of the week, but it didn't reveal much in the way of evidence: Three Bigfoot enthusiasts announced today that a series of genetic tests performed on samples taken from a carcass they claim is a linkurl:Sasquatch;http://www.the-scientist.com/article/display/24461/ came back as a mixture of human and opossum. In addition to the mixed DNA results, Tom Biscardi, Matthew Whitton, and Rick Dyer gave the audience two blurry photos, one of a solitary figure in mixed hardwood forest and another of the mouth of what appeared to be the tongue and teeth of a primate. Nevertheless, they held to their linkurl:claim;http://www.searchingforbigfoot.com/ that the animal they are currently holding in "an undisclosed location" is indeed the legendary Bigfoot. The three fielded questions from a...
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