Bladder-builder welcomes windpipe

It's a big day in the consumer media, abuzz with the news that doctors linkurl:engineered a windpipe;http://www.the-scientist.com/article/daily/53878/ for a 30-year-old woman using her own stem cells, but at the offices of linkurl:Tengion,;http://www.the-scientist.com/article/daily/53878/ a Pennsylvania biotech currently building bladders using patient cells, it's just business as usual. This news "confirms what we know," said Gary Sender, chief financial officer at Tengion. "We know we are in

Alison McCook
Nov 18, 2008
It's a big day in the consumer media, abuzz with the news that doctors linkurl:engineered a windpipe;http://www.the-scientist.com/article/daily/53878/ for a 30-year-old woman using her own stem cells, but at the offices of linkurl:Tengion,;http://www.the-scientist.com/article/daily/53878/ a Pennsylvania biotech currently building bladders using patient cells, it's just business as usual. This news "confirms what we know," said Gary Sender, chief financial officer at Tengion. "We know we are in an emerging field." Still, Sender added that any good news from the field of regenerative medicine is "very positive for Tengion." And for patients. "You and I as just citizens should be thrilled that there are advances in this technology," he said. "We think the more progress that's made in this field, the better." Just today (Nov 19), Tengion linkurl:announced;http://www.tengion.com/news/press/20081119.cfm that it completed a second closing of its Series C financing, receiving $21 million in additional equity. The company also recently wrapped up its phase...

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