Britain wants your brain

A shortage of donated brain tissue is hampering research into diseases such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, and dementia.

Elie Dolgin
Jan 6, 2009

A shortage of donated brain tissue is hampering research into diseases such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, and dementia, a team of British scientists warned yesterday (Jan. 6). About 10,000 brains are used for scientific research in the UK. But researchers say that they need thousands more fresh organs from donors with both diseased and healthy brains. There are currently only 20 brains to study autism and 30 brains to research Alzheimer's in the country. "There's a great opportunity to facilitate important research to discover cures and treatments which would go unfulfilled if we don't increase the number of brains available for research," said Paul Francis, a neurochemist at King's College London, at a press conference in London. 


Flickr/Gaetan Lee

The UK Medical Research Council is setting up a telephone help line for people wishing to sign up with one of Britain's dozen or so brain banks, The Guardian reported....

Related stories: 

Baby brain bank [November 2007]

The brain on stress [August 2007]

Researchers fear shortage of brain tissue [May 2003]

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