Cancer genetics gets personal

Researchers have developed a novel technique for identifying patient-specific biomarkers in tumor DNA which they say can reliably monitor the progression of individual patients' cancers. Their findings are presented this week at the American Association for the Advancement of Science meeting in San Diego and will be published next week in Science Translational Medicine. Image: Courtesy of Life Technologies and Digizyme, Inc."This study pushes the limits of what we can do and what we might be

Cassandra Brooks
Feb 17, 2010
Researchers have developed a novel technique for identifying patient-specific biomarkers in tumor DNA which they say can reliably monitor the progression of individual patients' cancers. Their findings are presented this week at the American Association for the Advancement of Science meeting in San Diego and will be published next week in Science Translational Medicine.
Image: Courtesy of Life Technologies and Digizyme, Inc.
"This study pushes the limits of what we can do and what we might be able to do in the future with regards to cancer treatment," said linkurl:Arul Chinnaiyan,;http://www.pathology.med.umich.edu/faculty/Chinnaiyan/ a University of Michigan cancer geneticist who was not involved in the study. For years researchers have known that human cancer cells have scrambled genomes, but finding these genetic rearrangements amongst the hundreds of thousands of normal DNA molecules in a patient's blood or other tissue had proved difficult. Previous attempts looked for mutations, or single base changes,...




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