Cancer lines contaminated

Three of 13 established esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) cell lines are not EAC after all. Instead, the lines -- which have led to two clinical trials, more than 100 publications and 11 US patents -- represent three different cancer types altogether, a study published online today (January 14) in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute (JNCI) found. Histopathologic image illustrating welldifferentiated squamous cell carcinomain the excisional biopsy specimenImage: Wikimedia commons"It's a s

Jef Akst
Jef Akst

Jef (an unusual nickname for Jennifer) got her master’s degree from Indiana University in April 2009 studying the mating behavior of seahorses. After four years of diving off the Gulf...

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Jan 13, 2010
Three of 13 established esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) cell lines are not EAC after all. Instead, the lines -- which have led to two clinical trials, more than 100 publications and 11 US patents -- represent three different cancer types altogether, a study published online today (January 14) in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute (JNCI) found.
Histopathologic image illustrating well
differentiated squamous cell carcinoma
in the excisional biopsy specimen

Image: Wikimedia commons
"It's a startling and somewhat alarming finding that the cell lines we thought represented specific entities actually do not," said cancer biologist linkurl:Ezra Cohen,;http://www.uchospitals.edu/physicians/ezra-cohen.html who was heading up a clinical trial based partially on experiments conducted with one of the three contaminated EAC cell lines at the time these results became known to the field a few months ago. "If you're going to do studies focusing on [a specific] disease, you probably want to do...
JNCIJCNI



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