Celebrating 60 Years of the Cold Spring Harbor Phage Course

This weekend, Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory is celebrating the 60th anniversary of the Phage Course with a two day symposium led by some of today?s most notable molecular biologists. First organized by Max Delbruck in 1945, the course has been instrumental in shaping the field of molecular biology. Delbruck assembled a small but diverse group of scientists to tackle fundamental biological questions using phage as a simple model system. By the mid-1970s, cloning and transposons sparked a genetic

Nicole Johnston
Jun 25, 2005
This weekend, Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory is celebrating the 60th anniversary of the Phage Course with a two day symposium led by some of today?s most notable molecular biologists. First organized by Max Delbruck in 1945, the course has been instrumental in shaping the field of molecular biology. Delbruck assembled a small but diverse group of scientists to tackle fundamental biological questions using phage as a simple model system. By the mid-1970s, cloning and transposons sparked a genetic revolution, and the modern incarnation of the phage course was formed, now called Advanced Bacterial Genetics.The symposium's focus both highlights the impact of the course on modern molecular genetics and includes discussion of hot new areas of bacterial genetics research by outstanding scientists in the field ? each of whom has been instrumental in the ongoing evolution of the course. This morning?s speakers included Jeffrey Miller, John Roth, Frank Stahl, Allan Campbell,...

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