Cell biologist dies

Gerd Maul, an accomplished artist and scientist at the linkurl:Wistar Institute;http://www.wistar.org/default.cfm in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, passed away last Monday (23rd August) of a heart attack at the age of 70. Gerd Maul Widely recognized for his discovery of new nuclear structures called "nuclear dots" in the early 1990s, Maul turned to vaccinology later in his career, pursuing a novel cytomegalovirus vaccine. The multi-faceted researcher was also an linkurl:admired sculptor and arti

Megan Scudellari
Aug 26, 2010
Gerd Maul, an accomplished artist and scientist at the linkurl:Wistar Institute;http://www.wistar.org/default.cfm in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, passed away last Monday (23rd August) of a heart attack at the age of 70.
Gerd Maul
Widely recognized for his discovery of new nuclear structures called "nuclear dots" in the early 1990s, Maul turned to vaccinology later in his career, pursuing a novel cytomegalovirus vaccine. The multi-faceted researcher was also an linkurl:admired sculptor and artist;http://www.the-scientist.com/news/display/37015/ who regularly showed at prestigious galleries in Philadelphia and beyond. "He had an incredible enthusiasm for his science, and a way of looking at things that other people didn't see," says linkurl:Louise Showe,;http://www.wistar.org/research_facilities/showe/research.htm an immunologist at Wistar and Maul's long-time colleague and friend. Born in 1940, Maul grew up in a post-World War II Germany, receiving his bachelor's and master's degrees in biology from the Technical University of Darmstadt, Germany. He completed his PhD at the University of Texas in...




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