Cloned Coyotes?

Disgraced South Korean scientist Hwang Woo-suk and a team of colleagues claim to have cloned the wild canine.

Bob Grant
Bob Grant

Bob Grant is Editor in Chief of The Scientist, where he started in 2007 as a Staff Writer.

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Oct 18, 2011

A coyote in Yosemite National Park, California, USAWIKIMEDIA, CHRISTOPHER BRUNO

Hwang Woo-Suk, the South Korean stem cell scientist who was found guilty of fabricating human embryo cloning research in 2005, and a team of colleagues have announced that they've cloned coyotes for the very first time. Hwang presented 8 coyotes, born in June, that he and his coworkers claim to have cloned as part of a project—funded by the country's Gyeonggi Province—aiming to clone several wild animal species.

Once considered a national hero and even bestowed the title of "Supreme Scientist" after claiming to clone human embryonic stem cells in 2004 and 2005, Hwang was later charged with embezzlement, fraud, and bioethics violations after it was found that he had faked many aspects of his research.

A team headed by Hwang was, however, successful in the first ever cloning of a dog, an Afghan hound named Snuppy born in...

According to the Associated Press, Gyeonggi Province officials said they will raise the coyotes before donating to them to zoos in South Korea and abroad.

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