COI changes at NIH?

The National Institutes of Health is suggesting reducing the minimum financial conflict of interest that must be disclosed, among other changes to its conflict policy, the agency announced this morning at a teleconference. Image: Wikimedia commons, King of HeartsIf the changes are accepted, the minimum financial conflict that must be reported to the agency will be lowered from $10,000 to $5,000. "Clearly the way in which science is moving forward, in order to be successful, partnerships betwee

Jef Akst
Jef Akst

Jef Akst is managing editor of The Scientist, where she started as an intern in 2009 after receiving a master’s degree from Indiana University in April 2009 studying the mating behavior of seahorses.

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May 19, 2010
The National Institutes of Health is suggesting reducing the minimum financial conflict of interest that must be disclosed, among other changes to its conflict policy, the agency announced this morning at a teleconference.
Image: Wikimedia commons,
King of Hearts
If the changes are accepted, the minimum financial conflict that must be reported to the agency will be lowered from $10,000 to $5,000. "Clearly the way in which science is moving forward, in order to be successful, partnerships between NIH-funded researchers in industry are essential," said NIH director Francis Collins. "We believe that it is essential to tighten up this situation to be sure we are obtaining and maintaining the public trust and the integrity of the scientific enterprise." Other proposed changes include making the institution responsible for recognizing and reporting conflicts of interest, as opposed to the investigator. In addition, institutions would be required to develop a publicly accessible website...




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