Menu

Conservation Biologist Ben Collen Dies of Bone Cancer

The University College London researcher investigated how environmental pressures affect animals.

May 22, 2018
Shawna Williams

UNIVERSITY COLLEGE LONDONBen Collen, a University College London PI whose research spanned ecosystems from Antarctica to Brazil, died on Saturday (May 19), according to the university. He was 40 years old. His wife writes on a fundraising page for bone cancer research that he had been fighting the disease for 16 months.

Many of Collen’s colleagues have paid tribute to him on Twitter. Dani Rabaiotti, an author and graduate student at the Zoological Society of London, calls Collen “a brilliant scientist and all round lovely person,” adding, “He was a great mentor to many + his advice helped shape the path I am on now.”

Collen’s lab focused on changes in biodiversity, how species respond to environmental threats, ways to reduce uncertainty in macroecology and biodiversity, and models of the projected ecological effects of different policies.

See “Extinction Risk for Invertebrates

While an undergraduate at Imperial College London, Collen did a stint as a research assistant on a carnivore research project in Kenya. He went on to earn a master’s degree at the University of York and then a PhD from the Institute of Zoology and Imperial College London, according to his lab’s website. He continued his research as a postdoc and, later, a research fellow at the Institute of Zoology, then started his own lab at University College London in 2013.

“Ben was a great conservation scientist but he was also a wonderful person and a central figure in our [Centre for Environment and Biodiversity] community,” according to a memorial written on Collen’s department website. 

The Zoological Society of London selected Collen for its 2014 Marsh Award for Conservation Biology. He was also an Honorary Research Fellow for the United Nations Environment Programme World Conservation Monitoring Centre, and served as an editor for several journals. He was married to science writer Alanna Collen.

January 2019

Cannabis on Board

Research suggests ill effects of cannabinoids in the womb

Marketplace

Sponsored Product Updates

WIN a VIAFLO 96/384 to supercharge your microplate pipetting!
WIN a VIAFLO 96/384 to supercharge your microplate pipetting!
INTEGRA Biosciences is offering labs the chance to win a VIAFLO 96/384 pipette. Designed to simplify plate replication, plate reformatting or reservoir-to-plate transfers, the VIAFLO 96/384 allows labs without the space or budget for an expensive pipetting robot to increase the speed and throughput of routine tasks.
FORMULATRIX® digital PCR technology to be acquired by QIAGEN
FORMULATRIX® digital PCR technology to be acquired by QIAGEN
FORMULATRIX has announced that their digital PCR assets, including the CONSTELLATION® series of instruments, is being acquired by QIAGEN N.V. (NYSE: QGEN, Frankfurt Stock Exchange: QIA) for up to $260 million ($125 million upfront payment and $135 million of milestones).  QIAGEN has announced plans for a global launch in 2020 of a new series of digital PCR platforms that utilize the advanced dPCR technology developed by FORMULATRIX combined with QIAGEN’s expertise in assay development and automation.
Application of CRISPR/Cas to the Generation of Genetically Engineered Mice
Application of CRISPR/Cas to the Generation of Genetically Engineered Mice
With this application note from Taconic, learn about the power that the CRISPR/Cas system has to revolutionize the field of custom mouse model generation!
Translational Models of Obesity, Dysmetabolism, Diabetes, and Complications
Translational Models of Obesity, Dysmetabolism, Diabetes, and Complications
This webinar, from Crown Bioscience, presents a unique continuum of translational dysmetabolic platforms that more closely mimic human disease. Learn about using next-generation rodent and spontaneously diabetic non-human primate models to accurately model human-relevant disease progression and complications related to obesity and diabetes here!