Creature cast

Most university professors have ideas for how to get their students excited about the science they're studying -- rarely do those plans involve claymation. Unless, of course, you happen to be Brown University evolutionary biologist linkurl:Casey Dunn's;http://www.brown.edu/Faculty/Dunn_Lab/ student. "Nature documentaries like 'Blue Planet' and 'Planet Earth' were a big part of what got me interested in science, and it was fun to kind of ape the best parts of existing nature documentaries while

Lauren Urban
Mar 25, 2010
Most university professors have ideas for how to get their students excited about the science they're studying -- rarely do those plans involve claymation. Unless, of course, you happen to be Brown University evolutionary biologist linkurl:Casey Dunn's;http://www.brown.edu/Faculty/Dunn_Lab/ student. "Nature documentaries like 'Blue Planet' and 'Planet Earth' were a big part of what got me interested in science, and it was fun to kind of ape the best parts of existing nature documentaries while giving it a more manageable sort of modular internet spin," says Noah Rose, an undergraduate biology major at Brown who took Dunn's invertebrate zoology class. Along with Rose and other students who take the semester-long course, about five other undergrads and graduate students mentored by Dunn regularly contribute to linkurl:"Creaturecast",;http://creaturecast.org/ a blog born out of a collaborative National Science Foundation grant on mollusk evolutionary relationships awarded to Dunn in 2008. As part of that grant, Dunn needed...

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