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Dandruff gets its own genome

I just got a press release that made me go ''huh?'' That's ''huh,'' question mark. Not ''huh!'', or ''huh,'' exclamation point -- which is what I like from press releases. If you don't see what I mean, answer me this: Does dandruff have a genome? According to the press release, from Procter & Gamble, it does. So I opened the Email to find out about this sequencing feat. It turns out, as you may have guessed, that scientists at Procter and Gamble Beauty had sequenced the genome of Malassezia glo

Ivan Oransky
I just got a press release that made me go ''huh?'' That's ''huh,'' question mark. Not ''huh!'', or ''huh,'' exclamation point -- which is what I like from press releases. If you don't see what I mean, answer me this: Does dandruff have a genome? According to the press release, from Procter & Gamble, it does. So I opened the Email to find out about this sequencing feat. It turns out, as you may have guessed, that scientists at Procter and Gamble Beauty had sequenced the genome of Malassezia globosa, which causes dandruff. I thought it might have just been a hastily written headline, but the company's web site includes a linkurl:page;http://www.pgbeautyscience.com/dandruff-genome.html called ''Sequencing the Dandruff Genome.'' Eager to learn more, I clicked on the ''Dandruff Genome Sequencing Story'' linkurl:link, ;http://www.pgbeautyscience.com/dandruff-genome-sequencing-story.html and learned that scientists had made some ''interesting learnings'' during the project. Among those learnings was that M. globosa...

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