Did Elsevier break its own rules?

A science publisher that holds copyright supreme has a double standard, a science blogger is arguing. This week, science blogger Mike Dunford of linkurl:The Questionable Authority;http://scienceblogs.com/authority/ posted a linkurl:blog;http://scienceblogs.com/authority/2008/08/reed_elsevier_caught_copying_m.php saying that Reed Elsevier had copied some of the content from his blog without permission. While checking out links to his blog, Dunford came across a page run by LexisNexis (a Reed El

Andrea Gawrylewski
Aug 14, 2008
A science publisher that holds copyright supreme has a double standard, a science blogger is arguing. This week, science blogger Mike Dunford of linkurl:The Questionable Authority;http://scienceblogs.com/authority/ posted a linkurl:blog;http://scienceblogs.com/authority/2008/08/reed_elsevier_caught_copying_m.php saying that Reed Elsevier had copied some of the content from his blog without permission. While checking out links to his blog, Dunford came across a page run by LexisNexis (a Reed Elsevier company), which contained excerpts from one of Dunford's posts on open access from a few weeks ago, which mentioned Elsevier's profits from 2007. Dunford's name didn't appear anywhere on the LexisNexis page, although there was a link back to the original blog post. Reed Elsevier has some open access content but primarily operates under the traditional publishing model. They have been vocal in their linkurl:opposition;http://www.the-scientist.com/blog/display/54442/ to open access. In his post this week, Dunford said: "I was not asked for, and did not give, permission for my work...
rl:The Questionable Authority;http://scienceblogs.com/authority/ posted a linkurl:blog;http://scienceblogs.com/authority/2008/08/reed_elsevier_caught_copying_m.php saying that Reed Elsevier had copied some of the content from his blog without permission. While checking out links to his blog, Dunford came across a page run by LexisNexis (a Reed Elsevier company), which contained excerpts from one of Dunford's posts on open access from a few weeks ago, which mentioned Elsevier's profits from 2007. Dunford's name didn't appear anywhere on the LexisNexis page, although there was a link back to the original blog post. Reed Elsevier has some open access content but primarily operates under the traditional publishing model. They have been vocal in their linkurl:opposition;http://www.the-scientist.com/blog/display/54442/ to open access. In his post this week, Dunford said: "I was not asked for, and did not give, permission for my work to appear on that page, much less in that format. Needless to say, I felt a little slighted." In a statement from LexisNexis sent to the The Scientist, the company said that the page is part of an internal database set up for Elsevier to keep track of what's being said about them in the media. So what's Dunford's beef? "I guess on a scale of one to 10 this does not even register too highly when talking about things like copyright," he told The Scientist. But the frustration, he added, is that "Elsevier expects people to properly attribute their products." Just this June, Elsevier, the publishing arm of the company, filed a copyright infringement suit against Encyclopedia Britannica over medical illustrations appearing in the encyclopedia. "If they want standards with how to treat intellectual property," Dunford added, "that type of thing begins at home." In the statement, LexisNexis agreed that proper attribution was not given on the page. "Whenever Web content generated by third parties is used in this way, it is the practice of LexisNexis to use only a small amount of that content, and to provide attribution to the content's author, along with a link to the relevant blog or Web site," the statement noted. "Our investigation concluded that, in this particular instance, these procedures were not adhered to fully." LexisNexis added that it will apologize to Dunford, remove the content in question, and implement refresher training for their employees to make sure content is attributed properly. "LexisNexis is committed to respecting the rights of copyright holders and content owners," the statement concluded.

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