DNA for the Masses

An Israeli company plans to synthesize DNA on demand for anyone, including those outside of research labs.  

Edyta Zielinska
Oct 30, 2012

A model of DNA
Flickr, net_efekt
A new company called Genome Compiler is planning to make DNA synthesis available to anyone via its software that pieces together chunks of DNA chosen by the user. The company would allow synthetic biology enthusiasts to design novel genomes at will.

Although there are many DNA synthesis companies that generate the sequences specifed by an ordering laboratory, Omri Amirav-Drory, the company’s founder and CEO told The Wall Street Journal that “they don’t have the design tools, the combine and debug tools, like you have in [the Genome Compiler] software.” The new program acts like a drag-and-drop puzzle to simplify the process. 

To anyone worried that the venture might result in rogue designers creating deadly or harmful organisms, Amirav-Drory responds that there are checks in place. “You have to start with one of nature’s designs,” he told WSJ. The submitted sequences are also run...

(Hat tip to GenomeWeb)

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DNA for the Masses

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