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DNA repeats hold RNA starts

DNA sequences that don't code for proteins and are repeated thousands or millions of times in the genome are more than just genomic deadwood: These regions contain promoter sequences that can instigate not only their own transcription, but the transcription of protein-coding genes as well, a study published online in Nature on Sunday (April 19th) reports. The paper is likely to spur a slew of new research into repetitive elements in the genome, said Philip Kapranov, principal genomicist at lin

Edyta Zielinska
DNA sequences that don't code for proteins and are repeated thousands or millions of times in the genome are more than just genomic deadwood: These regions contain promoter sequences that can instigate not only their own transcription, but the transcription of protein-coding genes as well, a study published online in Nature on Sunday (April 19th) reports. The paper is likely to spur a slew of new research into repetitive elements in the genome, said Philip Kapranov, principal genomicist at linkurl:Helicos BioSciences;http://www.helicosbio.com/ in Cambridge, MA, who wrote a commentary to the study to be published today in Genome Biology. "As a class [repetitive elements] are not just a junk DNA. They're not just parasites, but they can shape the architecture of the genome," he said. Repetitive elements such as retrotransposons -- sequences of DNA that can pop out of the genome, multiply with an RNA intermediate and then pop back in...
The Scientist



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