Menu

Donor Stem Cells Improve Cardiac Function

After a heart attack, monkeys given induced pluripotent stem cell–derived cardiomyocytes show more regeneration in the organ, but with risks.

Oct 12, 2016
Kerry Grens

WIKIMEDIA, SHAWN ALLENCardiac muscle cells derived from induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) and injected into monkeys helped the animals’ hearts recover from a heart attack, according to a study published yesterday (October 10) in Nature. The iPSCs came from donor monkeys who were immune-matched.

Although cardiac function improved in the monkeys, they developed arrhythmia, “typically within the first four weeks,” study coauthor Yuji Shiba of Shinshu University in Japan told ResearchGate. “However, this post-transplant arrhythmia seems to be transient and non-lethal. All five recipients of iPSC-[cardiomyocytes] survived without any abnormal behavior for 12 weeks, even during the arrhythmia. So I think we can manage this side effect in clinic.”

In 2014, Charles Murry at the University of Washington and colleagues observed cardiac regeneration after they injected monkey hearts with cardiomyocytes derived from human embryonic stem cells. The researchers also observed non-fatal arrhythmias after the treatment.

Shiba’s team took fibroblasts from the donor monkeys, converted them to iPSCs, differentiated them into cardiomyocytes, and then injected the cells into the hearts of five monkeys that had been subjected to a heart attack. “The grafted cardiomyocytes survived for 12 weeks with no evidence of immune rejection in monkeys treated with clinically relevant doses of methylprednisolone and tacrolimus, and showed electrical coupling with host cardiomyocytes,” Shiba and colleagues wrote in their report.

“They strengthen the case that a bank of pre-prepared matched [cells] could be used to treat patients, without relying on the long process of reprogramming and differentiating the patient’s own cells,” Sian Harding of Imperial College London told The Guardian.

Numerous clinical trials are underway to test the efficacy of cell therapies to repair injured heart tissue. For the most part, these rely on stem cells harvested from donors or the patients themselves, not cells that are reprogrammed into cardiocymocytes first.

January 2019

Cannabis on Board

Research suggests ill effects of cannabinoids in the womb

Marketplace

Sponsored Product Updates

WIN a VIAFLO 96/384 to supercharge your microplate pipetting!
WIN a VIAFLO 96/384 to supercharge your microplate pipetting!
INTEGRA Biosciences is offering labs the chance to win a VIAFLO 96/384 pipette. Designed to simplify plate replication, plate reformatting or reservoir-to-plate transfers, the VIAFLO 96/384 allows labs without the space or budget for an expensive pipetting robot to increase the speed and throughput of routine tasks.
FORMULATRIX® digital PCR technology to be acquired by QIAGEN
FORMULATRIX® digital PCR technology to be acquired by QIAGEN
FORMULATRIX has announced that their digital PCR assets, including the CONSTELLATION® series of instruments, is being acquired by QIAGEN N.V. (NYSE: QGEN, Frankfurt Stock Exchange: QIA) for up to $260 million ($125 million upfront payment and $135 million of milestones).  QIAGEN has announced plans for a global launch in 2020 of a new series of digital PCR platforms that utilize the advanced dPCR technology developed by FORMULATRIX combined with QIAGEN’s expertise in assay development and automation.
Application of CRISPR/Cas to the Generation of Genetically Engineered Mice
Application of CRISPR/Cas to the Generation of Genetically Engineered Mice
With this application note from Taconic, learn about the power that the CRISPR/Cas system has to revolutionize the field of custom mouse model generation!
Translational Models of Obesity, Dysmetabolism, Diabetes, and Complications
Translational Models of Obesity, Dysmetabolism, Diabetes, and Complications
This webinar, from Crown Bioscience, presents a unique continuum of translational dysmetabolic platforms that more closely mimic human disease. Learn about using next-generation rodent and spontaneously diabetic non-human primate models to accurately model human-relevant disease progression and complications related to obesity and diabetes here!