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Dr. Chocolate

With Halloween upon us, youngsters and adults alike will enjoy a night of regret-free linkurl:chocolate;http://www.the-scientist.com/article/display/20546/ bingeing. But how much do you really know about the sweet substance? If you're Stefan Bernhard, you can safely say you've made a lifetime study of the elixir of the gods. At a recent meeting of the linkurl:Experimental Cuisine Collective(ECC);http://experimentalcuisine.googlepages.com/ at New York University, Bernhard, professor of chemistry

Margaret Guthrie
With Halloween upon us, youngsters and adults alike will enjoy a night of regret-free linkurl:chocolate;http://www.the-scientist.com/article/display/20546/ bingeing. But how much do you really know about the sweet substance? If you're Stefan Bernhard, you can safely say you've made a lifetime study of the elixir of the gods. At a recent meeting of the linkurl:Experimental Cuisine Collective(ECC);http://experimentalcuisine.googlepages.com/ at New York University, Bernhard, professor of chemistry at linkurl:Princeton,;http://www.the-scientist.com/article/display/54332/ led a group of scholars, scientists, chefs, chocolatiers, food historians, journalists, performance artists, and foodies through the intricacies of chocolate production. He covered everything from chocolate's unique chemical properties to the ways in which those properties affect its manufacture. Bernhard spent three teenage years as an intern at Suchard-Tobler in Bern, Switzerland and has never lost his interest in chocolate. It came in handy when he was asked to teach a freshman seminar at Princeton which he titled __The Chemistry of Chocolate.__ It was, he...

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