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One afternoon in 2007, linkurl:James Kakalios,;http://www.physics.umn.edu/people/kakalios.html a physics professor at the University of Minnesota, received a rather unexpected call. Ann Merchant, marketing director for the National Academy of Sciences, was on the line. "We've got a request for a scientist to work on a superhero. Have you heard of linkurl:Watchmen?";http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0409459/ Merchant asked. That was like asking a movie buff, "Have you ever heard of Citizen Kane?" Ka

Victoria Stern
One afternoon in 2007, linkurl:James Kakalios,;http://www.physics.umn.edu/people/kakalios.html a physics professor at the University of Minnesota, received a rather unexpected call. Ann Merchant, marketing director for the National Academy of Sciences, was on the line.

"We've got a request for a scientist to work on a superhero. Have you heard of linkurl:Watchmen?";http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0409459/ Merchant asked. That was like asking a movie buff, "Have you ever heard of Citizen Kane?" Kakalios recalled. The producers of the film invited Kakalios to Vancouver to visit the set of Watchmen, a popular graphic novel that was being transformed into a motion picture. Kakalios's job: bring real science to the alternate reality of superheroes. That encounter between a scientist and Hollywood types was a test case for what later became linkurl:The Science and Entertainment Exchange,;http://www.scienceandentertainmentexchange.org/ launched in November 2008 by the National Academy of Sciences. The directors of the program "envisioned doing exactly what...
WatchmenNumb3rs,Fringe,Lie to Me,Castle,CapricaBattlestar GalacticaTron LegacyLostWatchmen,


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