Elsevier gets spammed

Anyone get an Email that looks like it's from Elsevier, asking for papers? Only, it's not really Elsevier, and you shouldn't click on any of the links. The Email, entitled "Elsevier: Building insights; breaking boundaries" and signed by Peter Throwher (Prof.), asks researchers to submit manuscripts in "all fields of human Endeavor." The message is quite bizarre in spots. "Papers submitted will be sorted out and published in any of our numerous journals that best

Alison McCook
Jan 7, 2008
Anyone get an Email that looks like it's from Elsevier, asking for papers? Only, it's not really Elsevier, and you shouldn't click on any of the links. The Email, entitled "Elsevier: Building insights; breaking boundaries" and signed by Peter Throwher (Prof.), asks researchers to submit manuscripts in "all fields of human Endeavor." The message is quite bizarre in spots. "Papers submitted will be sorted out and published in any of our numerous journals that best fits. This is a special publication procedure which published works will be discussed at seminars (organized by Elsevier) at strategic cities all over the world. Please maximize this opportunity to showcase your research work to the world." Apparently, it's an efficient operation - authors get an answer within one week, and all relevant papers go through peer review. But don't send your money to Nigeria, don't give your social security number to an Email from...
. The Email, entitled "Elsevier: Building insights; breaking boundaries" and signed by Peter Throwher (Prof.), asks researchers to submit manuscripts in "all fields of human Endeavor." The message is quite bizarre in spots. "Papers submitted will be sorted out and published in any of our numerous journals that best fits. This is a special publication procedure which published works will be discussed at seminars (organized by Elsevier) at strategic cities all over the world. Please maximize this opportunity to showcase your research work to the world." Apparently, it's an efficient operation - authors get an answer within one week, and all relevant papers go through peer review. But don't send your money to Nigeria, don't give your social security number to an Email from Citibank saying it needs it, and don't send in your manuscripts to the Email address included in the message. On Elsevier's Web site, the linkurl:publisher announces;http://www.elsevier.com/wps/find/editorshome.editors/spam that it has nothing to do with the Email, and researchers should ignore the request for papers. "The title of the spam email is a 'Call for Papers' and it attempts to lead the responder to make a payment. If you receive an email like this claiming to be from Elsevier, please be advised that it is not. Elsevier is in no way involved with or related to the email or its sender, nor is the email address an official Elsevier address." The publisher adds that it is working with law enforcement to "counter the spread and effectiveness of the spam."

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