Endangered wolves don't need passports

As Federal agencies and farmers call for removing the linkurl:gray wolf;http://www.fws.gov/mountain-prairie/species/mammals/wolf/ from the US endangered species list, a member of a species appears to have killed a calf in rural linkurl:Stevens County, Washington.;http://www.co.stevens.wa.us/Misc/about.htm; According to a US Fish and Wildlife Service press release, the kill ''appears to be the first confirmed wolf depredation on livestock in Washington State.'' The kill, which happened sometime

Ivan Oransky
Sep 6, 2007
As Federal agencies and farmers call for removing the linkurl:gray wolf;http://www.fws.gov/mountain-prairie/species/mammals/wolf/ from the US endangered species list, a member of a species appears to have killed a calf in rural linkurl:Stevens County, Washington.;http://www.co.stevens.wa.us/Misc/about.htm; According to a US Fish and Wildlife Service press release, the kill ''appears to be the first confirmed wolf depredation on livestock in Washington State.'' The kill, which happened sometime around September 4, was on a farm on the US-Canadian border, where the cows roam free, the USFWS' Tom Buckley told me via Email. So it's unclear whether the wolf was from Canada or the US. USFWS agency staff ''observed large canid tracks around the carcass, which showed injury and trauma signs indicative of a wolf kill,'' according to the release. The USFWS sees the reintroduction of the gray wolf into Idaho, Washington, and other western states as a success story, and farmers are eager to de-list...

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