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Expert advice on surviving $ mess

Build up cash reserves, don't over-cut in research and staff... These are some of the steps that can help life science companies get through the linkurl:current financial turbulence,;http://www.the-scientist.com/blog/display/55142/ according to an expert who has made a career out of linkurl:helping life science companies stay afloat.;http://www.the-scientist.com/2008/01/01/s48/1/ We're hearing a lot of linkurl:different prognoses;http://www.the-scientist.com/community/posts/list/233.page for th

Alison McCook
Build up cash reserves, don't over-cut in research and staff... These are some of the steps that can help life science companies get through the linkurl:current financial turbulence,;http://www.the-scientist.com/blog/display/55142/ according to an expert who has made a career out of linkurl:helping life science companies stay afloat.;http://www.the-scientist.com/2008/01/01/s48/1/ We're hearing a lot of linkurl:different prognoses;http://www.the-scientist.com/community/posts/list/233.page for the biotech/pharma sphere. Whether or not this area will be hit harder than others, scientists and CEOs are right to linkurl:be concerned.;http://www.the-scientist.com/article/display/55047/ Last week, I spoke with Gary Kurtzman, managing director in life sciences at Safeguard, which provides capital and expertise to linkurl:life science companies.;http://www.the-scientist.com/article/display/54879/ In some ways, private life science companies remain a safe investment, Kurtzman said, because it takes years for a verdict on that investment, in the form of results of an early trial. In all likelihood, the effects of the global decline in the economy will be long-lasting - for instance, several years...

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