Fake credentials in nanomed leader

Experts in nanomedicine are questioning the credentials of a researcher who has portrayed himself as an expert in the fledgling field, even starting a professional society and procuring a post as editor of the journal __Nanomedicine.__ Indeed, an investigation of his credentials reveals that he claimed to hold a directorship of a non-existent program, co-authored only two original papers in nanomedicine (one of which, a co-author says, he contributed to only editorially), and was accused of mi

Edyta Zielinska
Jun 24, 2009
Experts in nanomedicine are questioning the credentials of a researcher who has portrayed himself as an expert in the fledgling field, even starting a professional society and procuring a post as editor of the journal __Nanomedicine.__ Indeed, an investigation of his credentials reveals that he claimed to hold a directorship of a non-existent program, co-authored only two original papers in nanomedicine (one of which, a co-author says, he contributed to only editorially), and was accused of mismanaging the professional society to the point that some board members resigned and began a new professional group.
Image: Wikimedia
"I think that this individual is a good example of a field that is poorly- or under-regulated," Summer Johnson, executive editor of __The American Journal of Bioethics,__ told __The Scientist.__ "Everyone trusted the fact that he appeared to have high quality credentials." Chiming Wei, president and founder of an organization called the American Academy...




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