Family versus science

The pressures of family obligations and child-rearing are pushing young female researchers out of science, according to a new study released this month by the Center for American Progress (CAP), a think tank based in Washington, DC. linkurl:The report;http://www.americanprogress.org/issues/2009/11/women_and_sciences.html provides a contrast to an earlier report by the National Academies of Sciences that focused on dissecting the linkurl:subtle biases against women;http://books.nap.edu/openbook.p

Edyta Zielinska
Nov 10, 2009
The pressures of family obligations and child-rearing are pushing young female researchers out of science, according to a new study released this month by the Center for American Progress (CAP), a think tank based in Washington, DC. linkurl:The report;http://www.americanprogress.org/issues/2009/11/women_and_sciences.html provides a contrast to an earlier report by the National Academies of Sciences that focused on dissecting the linkurl:subtle biases against women;http://books.nap.edu/openbook.php?record_id=11741&page=1 in science.
Image: Wikipedia via Flickr: linkurl:Pi.;http://www.flickr.com/people/23453214@N04
CAP, together with the Berkeley Center on Health, Economic & Family Security at the University of California, Berkeley, School of Law surveyed some 25,000 University of California postdocs and graduate students for the report. They found that married women with children were 35% less likely to get a tenure-track position than married men with children and 33% less likely to do so than single women without children. In an article for __The Scientist__ last year, Association for Women in Science president Phoebe...




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