Fighting for the right to research

Scientists from both sides of the pond are taking dramatic steps to save animal research. Days after researchers and animal rights groups linkurl:staged parallel protests;http://news.yahoo.com/s/nm/20060225/sc_nm/rights_britain_animals_dc about the future of Oxford labs in the UK, Ohio State University primate researcher Sally Boysen and other protestors physically chained themselves to a gate outside a chimpanzee center slated for closure. linkurl:According to;http://www.ohio.com/mld/beaconjo

Alison McCook
Feb 27, 2006
Scientists from both sides of the pond are taking dramatic steps to save animal research. Days after researchers and animal rights groups linkurl:staged parallel protests;http://news.yahoo.com/s/nm/20060225/sc_nm/rights_britain_animals_dc about the future of Oxford labs in the UK, Ohio State University primate researcher Sally Boysen and other protestors physically chained themselves to a gate outside a chimpanzee center slated for closure. linkurl:According to;http://www.ohio.com/mld/beaconjournal/news/state/13981998.htm the Associated Press, the protestors failed, however, to keep the center open, and the chimps moved -- under police escort -- to Primarily Primates in San Antonio, Texas late Monday. University officials said that they had to close the primate center after Boysen, who started the lab in the 1980s, failed to obtain research funding since 2002. Which begs the question: Are primate researchers becoming endangered?

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