Flying above the media's radar

At the BIO 2005 conference earlier this week I participated in a panel discussion entitled "Guerrilla Media Tactics: Getting MORE Media Attention Without News." Part of the Public Relations/Investor Relations track, this session probably flew below the radar of most scientists attending the conference. But there were plenty of corporate communication- and PR-types in the audience.The panel, consisting of yours truly plus writers and editors from Fortune magazine, the Wall Street Journal Onli

Jeff Perkel
Jun 23, 2005
At the BIO 2005 conference earlier this week I participated in a panel discussion entitled "Guerrilla Media Tactics: Getting MORE Media Attention Without News." Part of the Public Relations/Investor Relations track, this session probably flew below the radar of most scientists attending the conference. But there were plenty of corporate communication- and PR-types in the audience.The panel, consisting of yours truly plus writers and editors from Fortune magazine, the Wall Street Journal Online, Red Herring, and the Forbes/Gottlieb Report, each weighed in on how best to pitch a story to a news organization, what works, what doesn't, pet peeves, and so on. The panel member's statements held no surprises really. Case in point: You'll get a better reception if you pitch a story directly at the magazine, for instance, rather than sending some generic boilerplate text. (In other words, don't send The Scientist a story idea about particle accelerators, because...

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