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Ge-what-ics?: Nation's teenagers

A significant portion of American high schoolers have seriously flawed ideas about genetics, according to a linkurl:study;http://www.genetics.org/cgi/content/abstract/178/3/1157 conducted by the country's largest society for genetics professionals. The study, which was published in this month's issue of __Genetics__, contained some fallacy-ridden quotations from the student essays. Here are some of the notable examples: "When people who cannot have children and want their own from their own bl

Bob Grant
Bob Grant

Bob Grant is Editor in Chief of The Scientist, where he started in 2007 as a Staff Writer.

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A significant portion of American high schoolers have seriously flawed ideas about genetics, according to a linkurl:study;http://www.genetics.org/cgi/content/abstract/178/3/1157 conducted by the country's largest society for genetics professionals. The study, which was published in this month's issue of __Genetics__, contained some fallacy-ridden quotations from the student essays. Here are some of the notable examples: "When people who cannot have children and want their own from their own blood, meaning having their genes, what will stop them from putting some cells into a cow to get their child?" "Genetics create a perfect being. Change the genes. Make that child perfect. There's no better solution to an impending health care crisis. A perfect child means that health care can be focused on an aging generation of people. What we can have is a sea of people who all look brilliant, who are all smart and who all have perfect eyes, nose and lips. It's...

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